Scanning, sorting and processing large numbers of photos

I guess for most of us this is more an issue of their private life rather than done professionally, and those woo do this for money should already have answers for everything…. But the IT aspects of this are interesting anyway…

So some of us, including me, have hundreds or thousands of photographs that have been created using analog photography. I am still using it, because I have a good equipment, the prices and availability for films and prints and scanning of the negatives to a CD are still good. My equipment is good and I am neither willing to give that up nor to do a major investment. It will come some day in the future and I expect that within five to ten years the reasonably priced and ubiquitous offers for handling of negative films and prints will disappear.

Anyway it is a good idea to scan all the slides and negatives, at least the ones that are of any interest. It is easier and cheaper to copy them, to get prints and to do some improvements with software like Gimp prior to creating prints. Also it is also possible to use and share them online.

Scanning with a flat bed scanner is not an option for negatives, it works with prints, but I think that it is too slow and I do not like the loss in quality due to the unnecessary intermediate step. This leaves two options, getting a negative scanner myself or using a service. So it is good to assume that they are already scanned for now. I organize the photos in a directory structure. The names should contain only 7-Bit-ASCII-characters, but no spaces, to be easier accessible by scripts and on the shell. I have scripts to rename them to this pattern, for directories and for files. They can be found under my github project „photo processing scripts“ with names:
* rename-canonical
* rename-dir-canonical
* rename-dirs-radically
Another interesting issue is finding and removing duplicates, but since the name of the file and its position int the file system do have some meaning, this needs some attention. When two identical files A and B are found, there are five resolutions:
* rm A (remove A, leave B)
* rm B (remove B, leave A)
* rm A ; ln -s B A (make A a softlink to B)
* rm B ; ln -s A B (make B a softlink to A)
* rm B ; ln -f A B (make B a hardlink of A. Apart from the inode number this is equivalent to the opposition direction)
Which of these is actually prefered? My scripts picks the last option, but does not actually perform it. Instead it just create output of the shell commands, which can be piped to a file or directly to sh, in which case they are immediately executed. Otherwise it is possible to edit the command, filter them or even change them with a perl one-liner. This can be found here:
* find-dups
For viewing the photos in the browser, I have added another script, that is called
* create-foto-index
It searches the current directory and all sub directories, except those starting with a dot („.“) recursively. For each image file a thumb nail image is needed, which is eather found in the .thumbs directory or created using the script
* scale-image
Then an index.html file is created in each dictory having links to its child directories, the neighboring directories and the parent directory. For each image the thumbnail is included and it is a link to the full sized image. With this it is easily possible to vieww the whole album in a browser locally.
Some images know their orientation already from the camera or phone, but they appear wrong anyway. These can be fixed automatically running the script
* auto-rotate
in the directory.
I have a web server and a CGI-script running:
* cgi/mark-images.cgi
which allows me to mark images with a checkbox or with a string. Using letters „D“ for delete, „R“ for rotate right (90 degree clockwise), „L“ for rotate left (90 degries counter clockwise) and „F“ for flip (rotate 180 degrees) and then press the OK button.
Running the script
* rotate-checked
which will delete and rotate the images according to the choices in the form.

This is already quite a useful situation. Images that are needed for prints or for the web might need some processing with GIMP:
* possibly rotate them in such a way that the horizon is horizontal and vertical lines are vertical, at least in the middle of the image.
* possibly correct perspective
* possibly sharpen
* possibly correct contrast and brightness
* possibly correct color saturation and colors
* cut out what is really interesting
* save it under a different name
* call create-foto-index again.
The webform and the CGI-script can be used for picking which images to edit. After having pressed OK it will be done like this:

gimp `egrep 'jpg$' </var/lib/wwwrun/mark-fotos/marked.dat` &

In a similar way images from a directory can be selected in indexf.html and then extracted to a ZIP:

zip my-archive.zip `egrep 'jpg$' </var/lib/wwwrun/mark-fotos/marked.dat`

which can be given to somebody or uploaded for creating prints or just unpacked in anther directory to have only the good images.

There are some more issues, which I might address in another article.

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