Binary Data

Having discussed to some extent about strings and text data, it is time to look at the other case, binary data.

Usually we think of arrays of bytes or sequences of bytes stored in some media.

Why bytes? The 8-bit-computers are no longer so common, but the byte as a typical unit of binary data is still present. Actually this is how files on typical operating systems work, they have a length in bytes and that number of bytes as content. When we use the file system, we have to deal with this.

But assuming a perfect lossless world, the typical smallest unit of information is not a byte, but a bit. So we could actually assume that we have an array of bits of a given length l and the length does not need to be a multiple of 8. This might be subtle, but it does describe the most basic case. Padding with 0-bits does not usually do the job, but there need to be other provisions to deal with the bit-length and the storage length. In case of files this could be achieved by storing the last three bits b of the bit length in the first byte of the file and using the file size s the bit length l can be calculated as 8(s-1)+b.

How about memory? Often the array of bytes is just fine. The approach to have an array of booleans as bits usually hurts, because typical programming languages reserve 32 bit for each boolean and we actually want a packed array. On the other hand we have 64bit-computers and we would like to use this when moving around data, so actually thinking of an array of 64-bit-integers plus information about how many of the bits of the last entry actually count might be better. This does bring up the issue of endianness at some point.

But we actually want to use the data. In the good old C-days we could use quite a powerful trick: We read an array of bytes and casted the pointer to a pointer to a struct. Then we could access the struct. Poor mans serialization, but it was efficient and worked especially well for records with fixed size, for both reading and writing. Off course variable length records can be dealt with as well by imposing rules that say something about the type of the next record based on the contents of the current record.

Perl and subsequently Ruby had much more powerful and flexible mechanisms using methods of functions called pack and unpack.

Share Button

PI-Day

When using an arguable stupid American date format, today’s date looks like „03/14/15“ instead of 2015-03-14, which are the first few digits of \pi.

Now we all know how to calculate \pi, we just use the Taylor series of \arcsin or \arctan, which unfortunately does not converge too well when used naïvely, but there are tricks to make it converge by calculating \arctan(x) or \arcsin(x) of some x with 0 < x < \frac{1}{2} resulting in a fraction of \pi that can easily be multiplied to get \pi from it. This approach is quite ok and understandable with relatively basic mathematical background, when allowing for some inaccuracy and intuition when trying to understand the Taylor theorem. But we can actually do better. \pi is somehow weird for being so irrational and even non-algebraic and also in some other aspects, when investigating it.

So here are some cool approaches to calculating \pi that are efficient and beatiful, but require a little bit more advanced math or trust to the ones who provided it (which should be ok for most people, but a no-go for mathematicians):

AGM

Use the arithmetic-geometric mean, also mentioned shortly in Geometric and Harmonic Rounding:

The arithmetic-geometric mean is included in long-decimal, and long-decimal uses the AGM-method for calculating pi.

Elliptic Integrals

Elliptic Integrals are somewhat weird, because they are easy to write down, but not really easy to solve. But numerical approximations to their calculation can also help finding about the value of \pi to some desired precision. Since elliptic functions, elliptic curves and elliptic integrals have fascinated mathematicians )and at least in the case of elliptic curves over finite fields also computer scientists) a lot, this must be cool.

Other

If you just want to calculation 10000 digits on your computer (should be Linux or something with Ruby preinstalled), just type:

gem install long-decimal
ruby -e 'require "long-decimal";puts(LongMath.pi(10000))'

That should give you some bed time lecture for the \pi-day. Enjoy it.
And please, do not memorize \pi to 10000 digits. It is possible, but there is stuff more worth while memorizing.

And please, do use a decent date format, even if you are American.

Share Button

Why I still like Ruby

Some years ago Ruby in conjunction with rails was an absolute hype. In the Rails User Group in Zürich we had meetups with 30 people every two weeks. The meetings every two weeks have been retained, but often we are just five to ten people now. Is the great time of Ruby over or is it just a temporary decline? Is Perl 6 now taking over, since it is ready?

Perl 6 is cool and could challenge Ruby and it is now getting more and more towards production readiness. This will happen next year. This is what we will say next year. But Perl 6 is or will be very cool, stay tuned… What about Perl 5? At least Allison Randall still likes Perl (5). But it has other areas of strength than Ruby, so I will leave my opinionated writing focused on Ruby.

But the hype is right now in the area of JavaScript.

There are approaches to use server side JavaScript, which are interesting, because JavaScript needs to be dealt with on the client anyway and then it is tempting to have the same language on both sides.

There are also approaches to move back from the server to the client and put more functionality into the client and make the server less relevant, at least the percentage of development effort of the client gets more and of the server gets less.

There are cool frameworks for the client development in JavaScript and in conjunction with HTML5 and these frameworks a lot can be achieved.

On the other hand we are exploring NoSQL-databases like MongoDB and MongoDB is using JavaScript with some extension library as query language.

The general hype is toward functional programming and voila, JavaScript is functional, it is the most functional of the languages that have been established for a long time and brought the functional paradigm to every developer and even to the more sophisticated web designer, everything under the radar and long time before we knew how cool functional programming is. On the other hand, Ruby (and by the way Perl and especially Perl6) allow programming according to the functional paradigm as well, if used appropriately. But in JavaScript it is slightly more natural.

Then we have more contenders. Java is not dying so soon and it is still strong on its web frameworks, JavaServerFaces and one million others, not so bad actually.

And the idea of rails or at least its name, has been taken over by the groovy guys to develop groovy on grails, which integrates nicely with a Java enterprise backend.

And the more functional languages like F#, Scala, Haskell, Erlang, Elixir (and some others for the guys that don’t find Haskell theoretical enough) are around and gaining or retaining some popularity. Will Scala support the Erlang-VM as alternative backend, like JavaScript and JVM are supported today (and dotnet-CLI in the past)? And Scala has a promising web framework with play, that does WebServices right, which is what is actually needed for the modern client side JavaScript frameworks, just as an example.

PHP was always the ugly baby, why did they implement a second Perl based on the subset of Perl they understood? Well, I am not advocating PHP at all, but there are some pretty decent PHP-applications that are working really well with high load, like Wikipedia.

The unequal twin of Ruby, Python, is doing pretty well as well on attempting to get a web framework called Django. I have not investigated it at all, but it seems to exist.

So, where is ruby and rails? Ruby is a beautiful language, that has done many things better than any of the languages mentioned here:

It is easy to learn.

It has a nice and complete and consequent concept for object orientation.

It allows all the functional programming, most of it pretty natural.

It has decent numerical types by default. Integer grow to arbitrary length, Rationals are included and Complex numbers are included. JavaScript does not even have integers, it just has one numerical type: double precision floating point.

It allows extending, even operator overloading for new numerical types.

And it has a useful and easily accessible web framework like rails and actually some contender as alternative web frameworks, like camping, sinatra and some others.

And the development effort and the amount of code needed for a certain functionality is still lower than in Java or C# or COBOL.

I do believe that the web applications that are mostly server based and are using just HTML or minimal JavaScript still have their place and will be discovered again as useful for many application areas.

To conclude, I think that Ruby did not make it to become the replacement for Java, that some saw in it and that was due according to the history of replacement of other mainstream languages that have moved to legacy in the past. But I do believe that it will play an important role for some years to come and beyond the current JavaScript hype. Off course it will be challenged again in the future and maybe something will replace the main stream and will make Ruby on Rails just another legacy area for web applications. But I don’t even have an idea what that will be. I don’t think JavaScript. Perl6, Scala, F# or Clojure do have technical potential to do so, but I do not see that happening in the near future. Maybe something new will come up? Or something old? Just remember, Ruby is about as old as Java.

We will see.

Read more in this discussion on Quora.

For those who are interested, I actually teach Ruby and it is possible to arrange trainings for two to five days, depending on the previous knowledge of the participants and the goals.

Share Button