WannaCry or better learn from it?

The malware WannaCry became quite well known, especially because it manifested itself on the displays of the German federal railroad and it even blocked most of the hospital infrastructure in the UK. Find some discussion on Bruce Schneier’s Blog… You find a a href=“https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2017/05/did_north_korea_1.html“>more elaborate article on his blog as well. Read Bruce’s blog article, he knows more about security than I do… 🙂

We might have observed, that this attack was targeting MS-Windows computers. The argument, that this is just because MS-Windows computers are more common, is no longer true. But the argument, that the MS-Windows developers just did a lousy job does not hold either. It was true 10, 15, 20, 25 years ago. We have seen it. But today I would assume, that they have improved and are doing a good job.

There is an argument, to favor open source over closed source for security reasons. If a software is open source, it is much more difficult to incorporate malicious features like backdoors into it or to leave security holes open by mistake, because the source code can be analyzed and fixed by anybody who has access to the internet and the capabilities. This is no guarantee, but it is a good thing.

The other argument is more like a question. How close are US companies to US government agencies? Do they do each other little favors? We do not know.

In any way, the people who did this malware attack are criminals and I regret that this has caused so much damage. Fortunately criminals are relatively rare. So the frequency of encountering them in daily life is usually not so high, unless we live in especially crime infested areas. But the internet connects us with criminals all over the world and allows them to damage us. So it might be ok in a good neighborhood not to lock the door or not to lock the bicycle. It gives a good feeling to trust our neighbors. But in the internet, the bad guys are there for sure and they will discover our unlocked virtual door. We can rely on that.

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ScalaUA

About a month ago I visted the conference ScalaUA in Kiew.

This was the schedule.

It was a great conference and I really enjoyed everything, including the food, which is quite unusual for an IT-conference.. 🙂

I listened to the following talks:
First day:

  • Kappa Architecture, Juantomás García Molina
  • 50 shades of Scala Compiler, Krzysztof Romanowski
  • Functional programming techniques in real world microservices, András Papp
  • Scala Refactoring: The Good the Bad and the Ugly, Matthias Langer
  • ScalaMeta and the Future of Scala, Alexander Nemish
  • ScalaMeta semantics API, Eugene Burmako

I gave these talks:

  • Some thoughts about immutability, exemplified by sorting large amounts of data
  • Lightning talK: Rounding

Day 2:

  • Mastering Optics in Scala with Monocle, Shimi Bandiel
  • Demystifying type-class derivation in Shapeless, Yurii Ostapchuk
  • Reactive Programming in the Browser with Scala.js and Rx, Luka Jacobowitz
  • Don’t call me frontend framework! A quick ride on Akka.Js, Andrea Peruffo
  • Flawors of streaming, Ruslan Shevchenko
  • Rewriting Engine for Process Algebra, Anatolii Kmetiuk

Find recording of all the talks here:
https://www.scalaua.com/speakers-speeches-at-scalaua2017/

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